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Episode 81: How ‘Letting it Rip’ is affecting the Australian Disability Community with S

CripChat Australia is produced and delivered by Australian Disability, it aims to educate, entertain and inform the general community how they can help us create a more accessible and inclusive society for people with disabilities, their friends, and family.

Hosted by Jonathan Shar, David Daoud, Ibby Dee, and Samantha Connor, President of People with Disability Australia

Content Warning: This podcast may include content unsuitable for children who have not been exposed to people with disabilities-related themes and issues that are sometimes expressed by using coarse language or outdated terms.

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Speaker 0 (0s): About, I guess maybe you people that I would want it as well. They reflect the antigens is a no, no many people can get access to it. It’s not enough as it is, you know, , I guess the access to it

Speaker 1 (24s): And, and the question, some people actually like to buy it and sell it.

Speaker 0 (32s): Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Yes. Yeah. It’s all got to come in from Julie. So hi everyone. It’s very good. Certainly. Yeah. It’s a very concerning situation with the attitudes of the home. And I hope that safety is the number one priority. I have a butcher and Lee, we had left in a vulnerable situation, but when your continuing to take a wave going out.

Exactly, exactly what all went that way. Grateful wanting to turn your health, not practicing to set your maintenance, to avoid getting the Yeah.

Speaker 2 (1m 37s): then three laid.

Speaker 1 (2m 22s): Yes. I am trying to, to, to, to actually spend my time to do what I used to do, but these days everything is not as, as all before.

Speaker 0 (2m 35s): Yeah. Yeah. You gotta look up for me. I just, I just didn’t want you to do activities office and then come back. Maybe show that or with a mouse went off by people, you know, I monitor my health and if I have any symptoms, then the last thing I’ll do is our coworker from my, my, in saying that I do need to access to the resident that digit says, just say to you, we don’t know.

I do have the bars.

Speaker 3 (3m 40s): I’m currently sitting right in the middle of a hot spot of different of cases at the moment, which is why I’m waiting for a COVID test. And while we’ve been thinking, so this is our first really, I guess, outbreak that is a bit more out of control than we’ve had in the past, which isn’t very much, many cases. You know, we still, we still have a contact register and, you know, exposure sites and contact tracing the PWD, da offices, people with disability, Australia, Irene Quayside, and Sydney.

I head offices in Sydney. So we’re pretty aware of, you know, what it looks like everywhere else. And most of my friends are in the Eastern states. So, you know, right in the middle of everything. So I guess it’s two thoughts. One is that we’ve had this, you know, feeling of safety here for a really long time, and now it doesn’t feel safe at all. And I think it depends on what kind of disability you have as well, because there hasn’t been much information coming to us as people with disability about, you know, people like us who we know have caught COVID and it become really crook, you know?

And so for me, as someone who has muscular dystrophy, I’m a wheelchair user, but I also have a thing that has heart and lung complications. So, you know, I’m at risk, but there’s no research online. There’s not really much information about other people who have caught it. And so we were in this bit of a weird situation where we don’t really know, but it’s just terrifying. So I, most people I know with my type of disability, I well, and truly walked away wherever they are, and really, really scared of catching it, which is a pretty sensible way to feel.

Speaker 0 (5m 28s): It’s okay. It’s okay. I’m pretty much in the sentence. I also have less on a wheelchair aha. Lung conditions. Yeah. I do have light on lung conditions. Like I said, it’s all about monitoring the seams and acting the best measure is when you do

Speaker 3 (5m 55s): Well. Yeah. And, and also that you’d be like the, the other thing is like cook personal care. Right. So it depends if you’ve got care or informal care, has family care play in the house of review, or if it’s someone who, you know, you rely on page four, well, you have a lot of casual people coming in, you know, how do you make sure those people are safe because the more people you’re exposed to and the more, you know, the more you’re at risk. So there’s a lot of Ellie.

If you share a house with poor ventilation, for example, you know, in a crowded type of house or, you know, you just, you know, have a lot of family members, I got sick. I like lucky than not all. But you know, there’s, there’s a lot of things that people can think about. But I think there’s a lot of things that we can do to keep ourselves safe as well.

Speaker 2 (6m 58s): he aye, aye. Wait, who you care.

day to day a all pre-brief pool.

Speaker 0 (7m 60s): Yeah, they’ll go. I cannot imagine this Jewish and that would be involved in, I think since the, myself, who’s also got a muscular dystrophy condition and personal care every day, she has a care guys.com man, play in the bottom. It’s saying that there’s been cases with the bars and the ads, but the question now is where do we go from there?

Speaker 3 (8m 37s): And then the other thing is, as people with disability, we’ve been trying not to talk about our various disabilities, right. Because we have to think about social model of disability. And so now it’s become really relevant. So now we kind of going, oh shit, this thing, what does this mean? So I’d look at Jonathan Guy, well, you’re a fit young, like, you’ll be fine. You have cerebral palsy. Right.

And I’m just assuming, because you have an accent Because they’re really good yesterday, but we’ve never had that conversation because I’m not a stranger in a supermarket and we don’t really consider it relevant. And the same thing with Evie probably has like a completely different type of muscular dystrophy to me. And then, you know, David, you blind David, I’ll just assume red glasses.

That’s the only thing. And so, you know, we, it’s kind of a thing where, you know, for David might not be able to read rapid antigen test by itself, right. Or know to stay away from people for social distancing. And so Jonathan might need more care than the rest of us. So we’ve got all these different circumstances.

Speaker 2 (10m 15s): Aye. Aye, aye. Aye, aye. Stay this with me.

Hey, I hear say my man Ks it.

Right. K

Speaker 1 (13m 6s): And Johnson. It’s a bit hard to search the especially distance when you can’t see.

Speaker 3 (13m 14s): Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. And we’ve all had these tricky things. Uber talking to someone who’s about to go into it to some people in health now there’s really, and I was saying, look, it would be really good instead of saying, you know, nobody can have access to rapid antigen tests or everyone can have access to a particular form of whatever, or it cost too much money for this. If we had some guidance around risks.

So there’s a thing called the Swiss cheese model of, of risk. And so if you think about a hazard, so something that can hurt you and you think about a whole bunch of Swiss cheese slices, you know, the plastic cheese that you have that has holes in it. And if you have all of those Swiss cheese slices lined up, then you can’t poke the thing through all the holes in all of them nicely. So that’s a good analogy that you use around, you know, something pulling through all the gaps, you know, you just wind them up in different ways.

So we think about all those things, thing, ways that can protect us. So you’ve got, you know, test and trace. We’ve got rapid antigen tests. You’ve got Ms. Yar tests, you’ve got social distancing, having an affair ventilation, you know, all of those things lined up with each other. And then if we think about ourselves, like as Jonathan said on a case by case basis, it should be that we’re able to assess their own risk. And I think one of the things we can do is to start looking at developing some guidance for people with disability, about what that might look and it might look like for David that, you know, diver gets support with reading a rapid antigen test, right?

Like me, you know, being able to get, to get to go to a testing place, you know, because if you don’t drive, there’s no way to get there except in a ride share vehicle and not go on public transport should get a $50,000. And if you go with, nobody will pick you up from a COVID clinic in a rideshare vehicle, you know, like, oh my God, like this alive, It’s disciple.

Of course the testing people here

Speaker 0 (15m 41s): Much for joining.

Speaker 3 (15m 43s): No I’m going to, I’m going to stay on guys. I’m going to

Speaker 2 (16m 24s): No,

Speaker 4 (17m 4s): Sorry. I didn’t get like us. Cause we just got lots of people talking that we happy to come back on because we had lots of disruptions, but also any, any of our other board members that are tight, my Tiara and get the things shoved up my nose. I get tickets to it. But thank you very much for having all the show. Okay.

Speaker 0 (17m 34s): Alright. Thank you, David. What are your final thoughts on this?

Speaker 2 (17m 43s): I think if people with disability don’t want to go out

Speaker 1 (17m 50s): In the community and freight, maybe they can stay more at home, but, and try to do that. Everything saves me the way they, they feel comfortable, but we need more rapid tests and we need to be more vigilant. Yeah.

Speaker 0 (18m 14s): Yeah. I think went in and bring the awareness to the government that, you know, we, we need the access to these IRA. Ts. They’re very important because most of us really have support because we can do,

Speaker 1 (18m 33s): They’re trying to get, that’s the thing they know. They know it’s important to words. If there’s a shortage

Speaker 2 (18m 40s): aye.

Aye. Aye. Aye. Aye. Aye.

Aye.

Speaker 0 (20m 13s): Yeah. It’s yeah, we need, yeah, it goes with us more run. The tests need to be out there constantly. Things will, you know, change. We’ll get access through the the government won’t be able to get, I guess, more stock and we’ll see how things go. But for now they say 51, a member for like the orders you’re getting out.

Well, probably get Bootsy out and stuff or just stay at home and then yeah. Yeah. Monitor your symptom. You want your group chat everyone. And actually we will see you next week. Goodbye for now

Speaker 5 (21m 5s): The support worker after class on Wednesdays who loves to cook and is into salsa. Dancing,

Speaker 6 (21m 14s): Mabel is the website that’s revolutionizing disability support. It lets you find and choose PayPal offering the support that you want. And because we’re online, it’s easy and affordable. Find your paypal@mabel.com that I use

Speaker 5 (22m 8s): My daughter, a support worker after class on Wednesdays who loves to cook and is into salsa. Dancing.

Speaker 6 (22m 18s): Mabel is the website that’s revolutionizing disability support. It lets you find and choose PayPal offering the support that you want. And because we’re online, it’s easy and affordable. Find your paypal@mabel.com that I use.

Speaker 0 (23m 29s): Yes. Welcome to the show. Samantha, how’s everything going

Speaker 3 (23m 38s): Well waiting for COVID kinders and exposure. So a little bit tricky at the moment, but keep the borders closed and WWI. So we’re pretty happy about that. And we’re just dealing with lots of issues nationally as know around COVID and as always the land of disability and BIS

Speaker 0 (24m 0s): Yeah. Yeah. It’s a scary world out there that we’re living in now. Yeah. Look at the idea of Letting it Rip in the community. What are your thoughts on that? So I thought,

Speaker 3 (24m 13s): Yeah, so Letting it Rip them, I mean, a lot of people at the beginning of this, we talked about eugenics. You know, the idea that, you know, that portion of the community can be, can die and you know, we could kill off a portion of the community and everyone laughed at that. Start laughing at that in the war. It’s a bad idea, obviously.

Speaker 0 (24m 42s): Yeah. I’m just letting people die because of the bars. yeah. We’ll come back to about that. So we lost you there.

Speaker 3 (24m 58s): Yes. I’m sorry that the idea was that, you know, to let it rip, you know, obviously 10 million people, cause it’s not just people with disability who are in the ice participants or a small portion of the community or even older people, Aboriginal people is 10 million in Australia who were at risk of COVID of severe illness. So dead. And so

Speaker 0 (25m 28s): bag saying that people with disability are vulnerable. I had the big poles to leave you now I’m protected. So slide two. They’re always risking their lives every day. You know, this is going out to the local supermarket, you know, getting the groceries, getting their sensitivities. They are risking their lives every day.

And so we should not leave.

Speaker 1 (26m 5s): Yeah, it’d be, it’d be in Sonata talking about risking their lives. We have people with disabilities also had support workers and their support workers also have to get out there and risk their lives too and come back to people with disabilities and expose us

Speaker 0 (26m 27s): That’s right. Exactly. Exactly. My last day of thoughts on the big people that are watching, what do you think of the idea of Letting it ribs? He not all strategy out. Yeah.

Speaker 1 (26m 58s): How are you protecting yourself? And is it working? Okay.

Speaker 0 (27m 2s): Yeah. Talk about the help that safety people just really right here in Australia. how the government is wanting to this. You’re not live with the virus. Just go out in the bars.

Speaker 1 (27m 25s): It’s eight. They’re probably talking about is that a stay at home and get depressed. And some people I have mental, mental breakdowns or gun with a virus and get immune to it.

Speaker 0 (27m 45s): Yeah, that’s right. Yeah. That’s right. It’s actually the David,

Speaker 3 (27m 51s): I reckon I should just be quiet and listen to you guys too, either way. So we thought,

Speaker 0 (27m 60s): Yeah. So what are your thoughts on accessing, you know, for the antigen tests, that’s a big problem that we face your mind. You’re not starting out people with disability.

Speaker 3 (28m 11s): Th they’re not the be all and end all of everything and not all of them are actually efficient for our Macron as well, which is something that people don’t necessarily know. You, might’ve heard people say, oh, you know, I’ve tested positive to a PCR test and negative to a rattle the other way round. So they’re not everything, you know, there’s also social distancing and there’s also washing hands and all that kind of stuff in good air ventilation. But for, for people with disability, they’re a really important part of preventative stuff.

People coming into our homes to give us care, you know, that it is, will be set, you know, happy, safe. So in other countries.

Speaker 0 (28m 56s): So yeah, we didn’t lost us there again. I guess how funny you are hard to access the antigens. Well, what do you think, Delta? I, I go to access. Alrighty.

Speaker 2 (29m 19s): yeah,

Speaker 0 (30m 32s): Yeah. Oh God. Yeah. I think people with disability in accessing the ads Digitas, it’d be talking about the rapid tests. Yeah. People with disability one. Yeah. Some people can’t use it by themselves, but a lot of people don’t know how to put that properly and they get the wrong reading.

Yeah. Sorry.

Speaker 2 (31m 13s): home rooms. with the and then they crave you to

Speaker 0 (32m 17s): Yeah. Yeah. About, I guess maybe I’m for, you know, people that I would want it as well. They’re roughly the antigens is no, not many people can get access to it. It’s not enough as it is, you know, I guess the accident

Speaker 1 (32m 44s): And, and the question, some people actually like to buy it and sell it.

Speaker 0 (32m 51s): Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Yes. Yeah. It’s all got to come in from Julie. So hi everyone. It’s very good. Certainly. Yeah. It’s a very concerning situation with the attitudes of the home and that safety is the number one priority. And unfortunately we are left in a vulnerable situation, but we need to continue to take a way to go and get out exactly.

Exactly. With what I went that way. Grateful wanting to turn your health, practicing. God, set your maintenance to avoid getting the divorced. Yeah.

Speaker 2 (33m 56s): then three were laid Phil.

Speaker 1 (34m 42s): Yes. I am trying to, to, to, to actually spend my time to do what I used to do, but these days everything is not as, as before.

Speaker 0 (34m 54s): Yeah, yeah, yeah. Look out for me. I just do. I just didn’t want you to do activities. God she’s office. And then come back time. Maybe an officer, grabbed him by people. You know, I monitor my health and if I had any symptoms, then the best thing I’ll do is our could work from my mind saying that I do need the access to the resident. That teacher says, she say to you, we don’t know.

I do have the virus.

Speaker 3 (35m 59s): I’m currently sitting right in the middle of a hot spot of different of cases at the moment, which is why I’m waiting for a COVID test. And while we’ve been thinking, so this is our first really, I guess, outbreaks that is a bit more out of control than we’ve had in the past, which isn’t very much, many cases, you know, we’re still, we still have a contact register and, you know, exposure sites and contact tracing the PWD, da offices, people with disability, Australia, Irene Queensland, and Sydney.

I head offices in Sydney. So we’re pretty aware of, you know, what it looks like everywhere else. And most of my friends are in the Eastern states. So, you know, right in the middle of everything. So I guess there’s two parts. One is that we’ve had this, you know, feeling of safety here for a really long time and now it doesn’t feel safe at all. And I think it depends on what kind of disability you have as well, because there hasn’t been much information coming to us as people with disability about, you know, people like us who we know have caught COVID and it become really crook.

You know? And so for me, as someone who has muscular dystrophy, I’m a wheelchair user, but I also have a thing that has heart and lung complications. So, you know, I’m at risk, but there’s no research online. There’s not really much you can option about other people who have caught it. And so we’re in this bit of a weird situation where we don’t really know, but it’s just terrifying. So most people I know with my type of disability, you know, well, and truly locked away wherever they are and really, really scared of catching it, which is a pretty sensible way to feel.

I think

Speaker 0 (37m 47s): It’s okay. It’s okay. I’m pretty much in the sentence. I also have less on a wheelchair. Aha. Lung conditions. Yeah. Look, I do have light on lung conditions, but like I said, it’s a little that I’m monitoring that seems then and acting this measure is when you do you pull.

Speaker 3 (38m 16s): Yeah. And also that you’d be like the, the other thing is like cook personal care. Right. So it depends if you’ve got a care or informal care, has family care play in the house, we’ll give you. Or if it’s someone who, you know, you rely on pace or you have a lot of people coming in, you know, how do you make sure those people are safe because the more people you’re exposed to then the more, you know, the more you’re at risk. So there’s a lot of, and if you share a house with full ventilation, for example, you know, in a crowded type of house or, you know, you just, you know, have a lot of family members, I guess it’s nice, like lucky that not all, but you know, there’s, there’s a lot of things that people can think about.

But I think there’s a lot of things that we can do to keep ourselves safe as well.

Speaker 2 (39m 17s): he oh, wait, who you care.

no, two day a all pre

Speaker 0 (40m 19s): Yeah, they’ll go. I cannot imagine this situation that would be involved in having a six don’t myself use old cyclotron muscular dystrophy condition and personal care every day. She has a camera guys come and play in the bottom. It’s saying that there’s green cases with the bars and the ads, but now is,

Speaker 3 (40m 56s): And the other thing is, as people with disability, we’ve been trying not to talk about our various disabilities, right. Because we have to think about social model of disability. And so now it’s become really relevant. So now we kind of going, oh shit, this thing, what does this mean? So I’d look at Jonathan Guy. Well, you a fit young black, you’ll be fine. We have cerebral palsy. Right.

And I’m just assuming, because you have an accent Yes. I’ve never had that conversation because I’m not a stranger in a supermarket and we don’t really consider it relevant. And the same thing with Evie probably has like a completely different type of muscular dystrophy to me. And then, you know, David, you blind over, I’ll just assume I’ve just read glasses.

That’s the only thing. And so, you know, it’s kind of a thing where, you know, for David might not be able to read rapid antigen tests by himself, right. Or know to stay away from people for social distancing. And so Jonathan might need more peers and the rest of us. So we’ve got all these different circumstances.

Transcript (by PodScriber.ai)

Speaker 1 (45m 25s): And I’m Jonathan, it’s a bit hard to search the distance when you can’t see.

Speaker 3 (45m 33s): Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. And we all have these tricky things. We were talking to someone who’s about to go and talk to some people in health now, federally. And I was saying, look, it would be really good instead of saying, you know, nobody can have access to rapid antigen tests or everyone can have access to a particular form of whatever, or it cost too much money for this. If we had some guidance around risks.

So there’s a thing called the Swiss cheese model of, of risk. And so if you think about a hazard, so it’s something that can hurt you. And you think about a whole bunch of Swiss cheese slices, you know, the plastic cheese that you have that has holes in it. And if you have all of those Swiss cheese slices lined up, then you can’t poke your finger through all the holes in all of them nicely. So that’s a good analogy that you use around, you know, something pulling through all the gaps, you know, you just lined them up in different ways.

So we think about all those things, being ways that can protect us. So you’ve got, you know, test and trace. We’ve got rapid antigen tests, you’ve got these Yar tests, you’ve got social distancing, having an affair ventilation, you know, all of those things lined up with each other. And then if we think about ourselves, like, as Jonathan said on a case by case basis, it should be that we’re able to assist her own risk. And I think one of the things we can do is to start looking at developing some guidance for people with disability, about what that might look like.

And it might look like for David that, you know, diver gets support with reading a Rapidash antigen test, right? Like me, you know, being able to get, to get to go to a testing place, you know, because if you don’t drive, there’s no way to get there except in a ride share vehicle. And can’t go on public transport should get a $50,000. And if you go with, nobody will pick you up from a COVID clinic in a rideshare vehicle, you know?

So, oh my God, like this alive, Of course the testing people here I’m going to stay on guys. I’m going to, I see the,

Speaker 2 (48m 43s): No, , their names.

Speaker 4 (49m 23s): Sorry, I didn’t get it like guess. Cause we just got lots of people talking, but really happy to come back on. Cause we had lots of disruptions, but also in any of our other board members that are tight my Tiara and give us things, shoved up my nose. I get tickets to it. But thank you very much for having on the show.

Speaker 0 (49m 48s): And we wish you all the various tests. All right. Thank you, David. What are your thoughts on this?

Speaker 1 (50m 3s): I think if people with disability don’t want to go out and in the community and afraid maybe they can stay more at home, but, and try to do that, do everything. So to me, the way they, they feel comfortable, but we more rapid tests and we need to be more vigilant.

Speaker 0 (50m 33s): Yeah. Yeah. I think went in and bring the awareness to the government that, you know, we, we need the access to these IRA teas. They’re very important because most of us really have support workers and we can do,

Speaker 1 (50m 52s): They’re trying to get that’s the thing they know, they know and support important words.

Speaker 0 (52m 32s): Yeah. And so yeah, we need, yeah. It to do with us more around the tests need to be out there. Things will, you know, change, we’ll get access through the the government won’t be able to get, I guess, more stock and we’ll see how things go. But for now they say for every one, a member follow the health orders, revealing unwell, probably to get a boost out and stuff or just stay at home and then yeah.

Yeah. Monitor your symptom that you wonder your group chat everyone. And actually we will see next week. Goodbye for now. I support

Speaker 5 (53m 26s): After class on Wednesdays who loves to cook and is into salsa. Dancing.

Speaker 6 (53m 34s): Mabel is the website that’s revolutionizing disability support. It lets you find and choose PayPal offering the support that you want. And because we’re online, it’s easy and affordable. Find your https://mable.com.au that I use.

—End of Episode—

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