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Disability Sector Rallies Support for Voice to Parliament

In an Australian first, the disability sector have come together with First Nations people to launch an Easy Read interpretation of the Uluru Statement of the Heart.


The Easy Read statement has been designed by the First Peoples Disability Network in consultation with First Nations people and people with intellectual disabilities.


This is an important step to ensure everyone has access to the Uluru Statement and a generous endorsement from large swathes of the disability community. The Easy Read statement builds on existing community translated material on the Voice to Parliament to create Plain English, Auslan and accessible video interpretations.


First Nations Disability Network, People with Disability Australia, Disability Advocacy Network Australia, Inclusion Australia, the Australian Disability Dialogue and members including Council for Intellectual Disability, VALiD, Life Without Barriers and Cerebral Palsy Alliance have all committed to using their networks to build awareness, understanding and reassurance on Voice and the Referendum.


The Minister for the NDIS and Government Services, Bill Shorten MP, welcomed the Easy Read interpretation and commitment from the disability sector for the Voice to Parliament.

“The Uluru Statement of the Heart is a moving document and this interpretation only adds to its significance,” Minister Shorten said.


“Democracy is only free when everyone has access to information, including those with intellectual disability. The Easy Read interpretation is an important part of the Voice to Parliament Referendum.


“As we’ve brought people with disability into the centre of NDIS decision making we’ve seen enormous positivity. We get our best outcomes when we listen to people with lived experience. There is a great deal of respect from the disability sector towards First Nations people and their fight for the Voice.


“The First Nations Disability Network has made the NDIS better understand how to provide services for First Nations Australians, especially in culturally safe practice and for remote communities. We want to make sure we are listening to the community and delivering what they need the first time. The Voice would do this at a national level.”

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